Public outreach event on the Holocaust, Refugees and Humanitarianism

The History division at the University of Huddersfield is holding a public outreach event on June 15 and 16, 2018, on the Holocaust, Refugees and Humanitarianism. Please have a look at this link for details.

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New research project started

A new digital humanities project has started on 12 March 2018 at the University of Huddersfield: Hansard@Hud. The project aims to provide a more accessible interface of the Hansard proceeding, the record of parliamentary debates in the UK. For more information, check the project’s blog and follow the project’s Twitter feed.

The project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and will run for 12 months.

Historia Ludens recap

We had a fantastic conference yesterday on gaming and history in Huddersfield. Much food for thought…

What became clear is that there is a great desire for historians and heritage folks to get engaged with games developers, but there seems to be a cultural gap between the two re development cycles, domain expert knowledge and language barriers. We hope to keep the ball rolling and make some headway here with these meeting. Watch this space for more.

And check out the storify of the conference.

Thanks also to Heritage Quay for hosting us, and the Royal Historical Society for financial support.

 

Historia Ludens — Conference on History and Gaming, 19 May 2017

Organized by the History Division and the Digital Arts and Humanities Research Group

University of Huddersfield

19 May 2017

This conference follows up on the workshop “Playing with History” that has been held in November 2015 in Huddersfield. Gaming and History is gaining more and more traction, either as means to “gamify” history education or museum experiences, or as computer games as prism into history like the popular History Respawned podcast series (http://www.historyrespawned.com/).

Besides discussing gamification or using (computer) games, we also want to explore gaming and playing in a broader historical-cultural sense. Can “playing” be used as category for historical scholarship, maybe alongside other categories such as gender, space or class? Historian Johan Huizinga’s Homo Ludens from 1938 looked at play and its importance for human culture. Can historians make similar cases for more specific histories? In recent publications historians have pointed to the connection between cities and play. Simon Sleight, for example, has worked on the history of childhood and urban history, i.e. young people appropriating public urban spaces for their ludic activities and their struggle with authorities over this. Archaeologists, as another example, have shown that much of the urban infrastructure of Ancient Rome was dedicated to games, playing and gambling, as it had such a big role in Roman life.

The conference will thus discuss terms like “gaming”, “playing” and “history” in broad terms. There are academic papers in the morning and round-table sessions in the afternoon for networking and demos.

Tickets (£10) are available via the University of Huddersfield web shop [please note: the ticket sale is now closed; please email to the address below and we’ll see if we have tickets left]. Please note: there are travel/conference bursaries for postgraduate students available on request; please contact Dr Alexander von Lünen (a.f.vonlunen@hud.ac.uk) for details.

The conference venue is Heritage Quay on the University of Huddersfield Queensgate campus. For directions please check here.

Programme
Time Activity
09:00 Registration
09:15 Welcome
09:30 Keynote: Adam Chapman, U of Gothenburg: Playing with the Past in the Present and into the Future — How Games Change our Relationship with History
10:30 Coffee Break
Panel session 1
10:45 Yannick Rochat, U of Lausanne: An Overview of Video Games with historical settings (1981–2015)
11:05 Luke Holmes, SS Great Britain Trust: Historical Games in Heritage Practice: designing a game for museum visitors
11:25 Holly Nielsen, U of Cambridge: Board Games — Propaganda and Politics through Play
11:45 Break
Panel session 2
11:50 Juan Hiriart, U of Salford: Designing and Using Digital Games as Historical Learning Contexts for Primary School Classrooms
12:20 Nick Webber, Birmingham City University: History, memory, and online game communities
12:40 Lisa Traynor & Jonathan Ferguson, Royal Armouries Leeds: Shooting for Accuracy — Historicity and Video Gaming
13:00 Lunch
14:00 Introduction to Round-Table sessions, formation of groups
14:15 Round-Table Sessions
15:15 Tea Break
15:30 Plenary discussion
16:00 Summary / Farewell
16:15 End of conference
18:00 Dinner (optional, not included in the conference fee)
Organisation committee:

Chair: Dr Alexander von Lünen, Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities, History Division

Committee: Dr Pat Cullum, School Coordinator for Student Experience, School of Music, Humanities and Media; Dr Katherine Lewis, Senior Lecturer in History, History Division; Dr Benjamin Litherland, Lecturer in Media and Popular Culture, Media Studies Division.

With kind support from the

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Call for Papers — Historia Ludens: A one-day conference on history and gaming

Organised by the History Division and the Digital Arts and Humanities Research Group, in cooperation with Heritage Quay

University of Huddersfield

11 February 2017

 

This conference follows up on the workshop “Playing with History” that has been held in November 2015 in Huddersfield. Gaming and History is gaining more and more traction, either as means to “gamify” history education or museum experiences, or as computer games as prism into history like the popular History Respawned podcast series (http://www.historyrespawned.com/).

Besides discussing gamification or using (computer) games, we also want to explore gaming and playing in a broader historical-cultural sense. Can “playing” be used as category for historical scholarship, maybe alongside other categories such as gender, space or class? Historian Johan Huizinga’s Homo Ludens from 1938 looked at play and its importance for human culture. Can historians make similar cases for more specific histories? In recent publications historians have pointed to the connection between cities and play. Simon Sleight, for example, has worked on the history of childhood and urban history, i.e. young people appropriating public urban spaces for their ludic activities and their struggle with authorities over this. Archaeologists, as another example, have shown that much of the urban infrastructure of Ancient Rome was dedicated to games, playing and gambling, as it had such a big role in Roman life.

The conference organisers thus invite contributions from a broad range of topics for a one-strand, one-day conference on gaming and history, broadly defined. Topics can include (but are not restricted to) Serious Gaming, Gamification in History Education, Gamification in Museums, Podcasts, Computer Games, “Playing” as category in historical scholarship, etc. There will also be a display area to showcase projects, either in the form of a poster presentation, or online demos.

The conference organisers strongly encourage postgraduate students to submit either a paper or poster presentation; there is a bursary for postgraduate students (details on request). The publication of proceedings is intended.

Please send your proposal (max. 300 words) and a short CV to Dr Alexander von Lünen, University of Huddersfield (a.f.vonlunen@hud.ac.uk) before 15 January 2017.

 

With kind support from the Royal Historical Society.Print

QGIS course — booked out

Dr Alexander von Lünen, Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities at the University of Huddersfield, is holding a short course on using QGIS in February 2017, in cooperation with Heritage Quay. Unfortunately, the course was booked out very quickly, before there was even a chance to advertise it properly. The DAHRG is intent on organising more skills workshops with Heritage Quay in the future, so watch this space, there may be another GIS course coming at one point…

New Book Out: The Digital Arts and Humanities

A new book has been published by Springer The Digital Arts and Humanities, co-edited by Alexander von Lünen, Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities at the University of Huddersfield, and Charles Travis, Assistant Professor at the University of Texas. The book offers a rich narrative on the potential of digital media in the arts and humanities, with a particular exploration of how the digital arts may inspire the digital humanities.

The book hopes to address some of the methodological conservatism in the digital humanities that, for example, Andrew Prescott has observed by stating that the digital humanities have become “annexed by a very conservative view of the nature of humanities scholarship”. Oftentimes, the digital humanities are merely creating online repositories and then use quantitative methods to analyse them. This books sets out to discuss these tensions, digital vs. non-digital scholarship, by broadening the scope to topics such as performance art, neogeography or conflict studies.

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Recap from the INTH 2016

From 23–26 August 2016 the International Network for the Theory of History (INTH) held a conference in Ouro Preto, Brazil. Dr Alexander von Lünen, Senior Lecturer for Digital Humanities at the University of Huddersfield, presented a paper on the concept of “presence” applied to Digital History. The term “presence” in the philosophy of history refers to the process of the narration of the past by historians, and thus translating it into the present, as well as the “presence” of the past, for example in memorials and political debates.

Dr von Lünen argued that Digital History has no present, as most of its advocates live in the past, i.e. methods and ideas developed in the 1950s and 1960s (sometimes even earlier) are still being discussed as standard methodology, when the technology and its applications have made big strides elsewhere in the meantime. This may explain why digital tools are still on the fringes of the subject of history.

There were two sessions on Digital History at the INTH 2016 with a good level of attendance and participation. It was widely accepted that digital media are key to historical scholarship in the form of dissemination etc., but there were many uncertainties how digital tools could be harnessed for historical scholarship beside publication platforms or quantitative methods. The debate continues…